Faith and future planning

Planning for your future healthcare, living with a long term medical condition or nearing the end of your life or even is a time where spirtual and religious support can be immensely helpful to patients and their loved ones. It may be that you have specific care preferences, or cultural and religious considerations that you would like to be shared with your healthcare professionals. We have asked faith leaders from some of the world’s leading religions to give their perspective of some of the issues associated with planning future healthcare in case this might be helpful for you or a loved one.

The Muslim Perspective: Iman Yunus Dudhwala

“The Prophet Muhammed advised to: “Take benefit of five before five: Your youth before your old age, your health before your sickness, your wealth before your poverty, your free time before you are preoccupied, and your life before your death”. Preparation of the future, the unknown, the unseen, whether itt be illness, old age, death or any eventuality has always been encouraged within Islam. “It is the duty of a Muslim who has anything to bequest not to let two nights pass without writing a Will about it”, said the Prophet Muhammed. The emphasis on not allowing more than two nights to pass is indicative of the recognition that anything can happen at anytime.

All the organisations involved have signed formal agreements that govern how care plan information is used and protected, and they undertake to provide CMC with updated lists of staff who are trained and authorised to access the system.

It is important to emphasise that the CMC care plan is not a legally binding document: a clinician who chooses a method of care that is not expressed will be able to support their decision-making with sound clinical reasoning.

An Advance Decision to Refuse Treatment (ADRT) may be attached to the CMC plan. If the ADRT is valid and applicable, it has legally binding status, whether it sits within CMC or not.

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The Muslim Perspective: Dr Musharraf Hussain

I have shown that organ donation is compatible with Islamic teachings and is the fulfilment of the objectives of Shariah. The case for donating organs is stronger than the case for not doing so.

Muslims believe in the spiritual creation of life, which invests it with inviolable dignity and sanctity. On the other hand, we also believe in the right of a sick person to be given opportunity to improve his or her quality of life by organ donation. The National councils of Muslim scholars from 10 different countries have so far endorsed the permissibility of organ donations.

The Christian Perspective: Bishop James Jones

“As we come to the close of our life our relationships intensify even though our physical and emotional energy wanes. We become all the more aware of the impact our dying will have on those nearest and dearest to us. We sense more keenly how increasingly dependent we are on them and on our carers, nurses and doctors. And our relationship with what lies beyond comes more into focus, however clearly or dimly we may perceive it. These physical, emotional and spiritual aspects are all equally important dimensions of our life especially in its closing phase. And any tragic incident not only brings trauma and suffering to ourselves but to all of our loved ones.

All the organisations involved have signed formal agreements that govern how care plan information is used and protected, and they undertake to provide CMC with updated lists of staff who are trained and authorised to access the system.

It is important to emphasise that the CMC care plan is not a legally binding document: a clinician who chooses a method of care that is not expressed will be able to support their decision-making with sound clinical reasoning.

An Advance Decision to Refuse Treatment (ADRT) may be attached to the CMC plan. If the ADRT is valid and applicable, it has legally binding status, whether it sits within CMC or not.

Read more

The Jewish Perspective: Rabbi Julia Neuberger

“A time to be born and a time to die”, says the book of Kohelet (Ecclesiastes). Though Jewish tradition emphasises life and the preservation of human life, there is a time when our lives must end. To that end, knowing what we want and where we want to be is of paramount importance- to us ourselves, if we are facing our deaths, but also to our nearest and dearest, for whom mourning will be less agonising if they feel that they have done all they can to enable us to have the kind of death we wanted, where we wanted. So making a plan and stating what we want becomes of critical importance, and thinking it through, on our own and with loved ones and trusted professionals, becomes something we must do.

All the organisations involved have signed formal agreements that govern how care plan information is used and protected, and they undertake to provide CMC with updated lists of staff who are trained and authorised to access the system.

It is important to emphasise that the CMC care plan is not a legally binding document: a clinician who chooses a method of care that is not expressed will be able to support their decision-making with sound clinical reasoning.

An Advance Decision to Refuse Treatment (ADRT) may be attached to the CMC plan. If the ADRT is valid and applicable, it has legally binding status, whether it sits within CMC or not.

Read more

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